Red Tailed Black Cockatoos

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

It is predicted that without action, up to half of Australia’s birds will go extinct in the 21st century.

The South-eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii graptogyne) is one of the species in trouble.  The major reason for the decline of the Red-tailed Black Ccockatoo is loss of habitat, primarily as a result of clearing for agriculture. Research estimates over 62 per cent of its original woodland habitat has been cleared. As a result, a lack of food availability is thought to be the main threat to the red-tailed black-cockatoo. As little as three per cent of buloke woodland remains and these are continuing to be lost through tree decline related to pastoral or agricultural activities, senescence (old age), or removal.

Species: Red-tailed Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii graptogyne)
Location: Victoria
Status: Endangered
Threats: Habitat clearing
Our work: monitoring, habitat restoration, predator control, community education

Taking action to conserve the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

Urgent works to replant trees and protect nesting sites have been underway for some time and Conservation Volunteers is taking additional steps to rehabilitate remnant bushland and farm properties to add extra momentum to the recovery effort.

Plant new stands of stringybark and buloke to provide more important feeding habitat in the future. Protect red-tailed black-cockatoo habitat including populations, occurrences and remnant stands of stringybark and buloke and red gums for roosting. Avoid burning areas of stringybark as this reduces the food supply.

Take part in the recovery team’s annual survey in April.

Description and Distribution

The red-tailed black cockatoo is a large bird, up to –60 centimetres in length.  An adult male is glossy black with bright red panels in its tail. The female and juvenile differ by the yellow spots found on their heads, yellow bars on the chest and yellow orange tail panels. The red-tailed black-cockatoo may be seen alone during the breeding season, or in flocks containing up to 100 or more birds during autumn and winter.

The red-tailed black cockatoo is a specialist feeder, relying on seeds of brown and desert stringybark and buloke trees. It nests in deep hollows in large eucalypt trees, which may be more than 200 years old. A single egg is incubated by the female,with the chick taking almost three months to make its first flight. Nestlings are fed only by the female, who relies on the male to bring food. The red-tailed black-cockatoo may live in the wild for more than 30 years.

The south-eastern red-tailed Black Cockatoo is only found in south-east South Australia and south-west Victoria, where it occurs as a single population, covering an area of approximately 18,000 square kilometres. 

Help save the Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo

Saving red-tailed black cockatoo is urgent, important and costly. You can volunteer to assist in creating and protecting habitat for the red-tailed black cockatoo, conducting annual population survey or donate!

Donate

Would you like to give the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo a wild future? You can do so by donating through our secure online system.

Volunteer

By volunteering on one of our field projects, you can make a practical contribution and help give the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo a wild future.

Further Information

For further information on the Red Tailed Black Cockatoo the national recovery plan provides useful reference.

 

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